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The Saints

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Noel-Blog

Welcome to S+L’s Weekly News Round-Up. As the Director of Marketing and Communications here at S+L, many interesting Catholic news stories and articles come across my desk on a daily basis. Some of them we’ll cover on our different television programs and others I’d like to share with you on this blog.

This blog column is where I’ll point out some of the more interesting news pieces that I’ve come across over the past week! Enjoy!

Ok, so we are in the home stretch for Lent. As you know, we are right in middle of “the” most important week of the liturgical year. Check out this excellent infographic that illustrates, in one view, the narrative of Holy Week gospels:

Info Graphic - Holy Week

The Lenten season is a time for us to reflect on our relationship with Jesus and what we can do to improve it. So who better to turn to than the saints! They are great teachers of how to listen to God and discern what He expects of us on this short journey here on earth.

That being said, here are a few pretty cool articles on saints that I thought I might share. This first piece from Church Pop is a bunch of pics of saints when they were children and it made me realize how I had always thought these saints were superhuman or something, but they were actually just like you and me! Check it out here.

As I continued my search, I found these fascinating stories of the miraculous events that took place in these saints’ lives. Many of them were killed for their faith but God used these public killings to change the hearts of those who witnessed them. Imagine having your head chopped off but still continue to preach! Yep, that’s what happened to St. Denis. Check out his story and find how these saints wouldn’t die!

Continuing on the “Saints” theme, here are some more great stories about the weird and wonderful ways that God works miracles when you are completed devoted and living by the words He gave us through Jesus. I really love the story about St. John Cantius when he was mugged and robbed and then ran back to the robbers to give them the extra money he had found in his pocket. The robbers were so amazed by what he did and they were converted! A great witness to what can happen when you practice Jesus’ teaching about “turning the other cheek”. Check out the other 7 epic saint stories.

QUIZ TIME!

Ok, here is an interesting online quiz on Saints. Let’s see how well you do on this one. I admit that this was a difficult one. This quiz is titled WHICH SAINT SAID IT?

My guess is that you didn’t do very well. Now, don’t get embarrassed since I’m talking from personal failed experience. But don’t worry, here is another quiz from CNN that, hopefully, is a little bit easier. Check it out – HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW JESUS?

On a final note, I just had to share this one with you. I know its not on today’s theme of Saints, but this one I found very interesting. Apparently, there is a rise of Muslims converting to Christianity in Morocco and its causing some issues in the Muslim community. Read about it here.

I leave you now with this funny cartoon that has absolutely nothing to do with any of the topics above. Although some of my colleagues in the marketing team didn’t quite get it, I found it hilarious and couldn’t stop laughing. So I hope you have the same humour that I have and enjoy this mid-week chuckle!

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Well, that’s it for me this week folks. I’d love to hear your thoughts and comments on these stories. If you have any interesting stories yourself, please feel free to send them to me!

I hope you enjoy these little stories! I certainly have. Till next week!

– Noel

Feast of St. John Bosco and the 200th Anniversary of his Birth

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St. John Bosco, founder of the Salesian Society was born of poor parents in a little cabin at Becchi, a hillside hamlet near Castelnuovo, Piedmont, Italy, August, 16, 1815. He was raised in a Catholic family but was too young ever to know his father who died when John was only two years old. John’s mother raised four children and taught them the importance of their faith.

At the age of four, John began to do small jobs to earn money to support the household. As a child, John’s favorite pastime was magicians. When he returned home, he practiced their tricks until he had mastered them, and then he would go on the street and perform asking only prayers as payment. From his childhood, St. John Bosco had a great desire to become a priest and help young boys who like himself were not afforded all the pleasures in life. He worked hard so he could afford to leave his family and attend school. Eventually John entered the seminary.  He excelled in his studies and served as a model to other seminarians on how to live a holy life of happiness. At the age of 26, John was ordained to the priesthood and set out to take his message to the world.

St. John began his ministry to the young by first forming catechism classes that met after Sunday Mass. At these classes he would offer schooling in the faith for free and he soon had a group of over 400 children to teach. St. John’s enthusiasm and emphasis on teaching boys drew ridicule from some of his peers who did not see its value, but John saw the need to train the future of the Church and allow their youthful energy to be put to work for the greater glory of God. John’s catechism school grew into a full-fledged school where boys could receive an education, learn a trade, and love Jesus. As much ridicule that John received, he also received assistance in the form of money and he also began to attract followers to his ideals.

Bosco John Family AlbumJohn’s perseverance in the face of all difficulties led many to the conclusion that he was insane, and an attempt was even made to confine him in an asylum. Complaints were lodged against him, declaring his community to be a nuisance, owing to the character of the boys he befriended. From the Rifugio the Oratory was moved to St. Martin’s, to St. Peter’s Churchyard, to three rooms in Via Cottolengo, where the night schools were resumed, to an open field, and finally to a rough shed upon the site of which grew up an nearby, where he was joined by his mother.

“Mama Margaret”, as Don Bosco’s mother came to be known, gave the last ten years of her life in devoted service to the little inmates of this first Salesian home. When she joined her son at the Oratory the outlook was not bright. But sacrificing what small means she had, even to parting with her home, its furnishings, and her jewelry, she brought all the solicitude and love of a mother to these children of the streets. The evening classes increased and gradually dormitories were provided for many who desired to live at the Oratory.  Thus was founded the first Salesian Home which now houses about one thousand boys.

The municipal authorities by this time had come to recognize the importance of the work which Don Bosco was doing, and he began with much success a fund for the erection of technical schools and workshops. These were all completed without serious difficulty.

With the encouragement of Pope Pius IX, John gathered 17 men together into a community and founded the Society of St. Francis de Sales in 1859. This society is better known as the Salesians and concentrates on education and missionary work, especially aiming at the needs of the young.

In 1868 to meet the needs of the Valdocco quarter of Turin, Don Bosco resolved to build a church. Accordingly a plan was drawn in the form of a cross covering an area of 1,500 sq. yards. He experienced considerable difficulty in raising the necessary money, but the charity of some friends Bosco John 3finally enabled him to complete the project. St. John Bosco died January 31, 1888, after spending his whole life working for youth and is the patron of editors. John

John Bosco educated the whole person. For Don Bosco, being a Christian was a full-time effort, not a once-a-week, Sunday experience.  The Saint of Turin reached out to children whom no one cared for despite ridicule and insults.  He was beatified in 1929 and canonized in 1934.  Pope John Paul II declared him ‘Father and Teacher of Youth’ on the centenary of his death. May St. John Bosco help us to make a place in our educational institutions and parish communities for young people who are living on the peripheries of society.

Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini – Remembering the First American Saint on her Feast Day

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Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini
Remembering the First American Saint on her Feast Day
Fr. Thomas Rosica, CSB

Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini, known to the world as ‘Mother Cabrini’ left an indelible imprint on the Church in the United States and around the world. She was the first American saint canonized in Rome in 1946. Born Maria Francesca Cabrini on July 15, 1850 in Sant’Angelo Lodigiano in Lombardy, Italy, Maria took religious vows in 1877. Three years later, she became one of the seven founding members of the Institute of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. She then set up two missions in Rome all the while nursing her true dream, which was to be a missionary in China.

Mother Cabrini gained an audience with Pope Leo XII seeking his approval for this missionary endeavour. However, at this time in history, tens of thousands of Italian immigrants were arriving in the United States and in desperate need of pastoral care. Poor and destitute, cut off from their home and tradition, Italians were encountering difficulties adjusting to the Anglo Saxon, American way of life.

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The Pope told Cabrini “Go West, Not East,” telling her the Church needed her more in the USA than in China. Despite her initial hesitation she accepted the Pope’s view and soon after began her long and legendary service to the Italian immigrant community and poor she encountered in the US. She founded an orphanage in New York, which would become the first of 67 institutions she launched in New York, Chicago, Seattle, New Orleans, Denver and Los Angeles.

Mother Cabrini’s willingness to forsake her own personal ambition to evangelize in China turned into a blessing for millions of underprivileged immigrants who benefited from her ministry. Sometimes when we are determined to have our way, we should stop and listen to the voice of God, and to those we trust, to make sure we truly are following the right course.

When I was growing up in an Italian-American household, we often heard stories of the saints and blesseds from my grandparents and parents. Two Italians, of course, were at the top of the list: Mother Cabrini and Padre Pio. St. Mother Cabrini’s prayer for humility was given to us and I have kept it ever since in my Bible.

“Lord Jesus Christ, I pray that you may fortify me witMother Cabrini 1h the grace of your Holy Spirit, and give your peace to my soul, that I may be free from all needless anxiety and worry. Help me to desire always that which is pleasing and acceptable to you, so that your will may be my will.

Grant that I may be free from unholy desires, and that, for your love, I may remain obscure and unknown in this world, to be known only to you.

Do not permit me to attribute to myself the good that you perform in me and through me, but rather, referring all honor to you, may I admit only to my infirmities, so that renouncing sincerely all vainglory which comes from the world, I may aspire to that true and lasting glory that comes from you. Amen.”

 

The Misunderstood Pope airs on S+L

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On the occasion of the beatification of Paul VI, Goya Productions launches a new documentary that rediscovers the figure of the pope unfairly criticized and forgotten. To him do we credit, among other things, the famous encyclical Humanae Vitae. This is a one of the themes being discussed on the Synod of the Family that has been taking place in Rome these past two weeks and that culminates with the beatification of Paul VI on October 19.

The hour-long documentary shows the life of John Baptist Montini, a life marked by the most dramatic upheavals of the twentieth century: from his encounters with fascism as a youth and living through World War II with Pope Pius XII, through the bitter ordeal of his pontificate.

After the death of John XXIII, Paul VI was given the task of bringing the Second Vatican Council to a conclusion and then govern a quite-shaken post-conciliar Church through one of the most terrible crisis in history. A victim of vicious attacks by fundamentalists Lefebrians, by guerrilla priests, by promoters of the sexual revolution, and by an unscrupulous press, Paul VI was able to maintain the direction of the Church through a revolution which shook the moral foundations of civilization.

Paul VI was the first Vicar of Christ to visit Africa, America, Oceania and Asia. He was the first to visit the Holy Land and the first to speak at the United Nations. He was an open-minded, pious Pope – perhaps too modern and prophetic to be understood by the people of his time.

This documentary shows images never before seen in Spain, as his assassination attempt in the Philippines, the attack on the Michelangelo’s Pietà and his denouncement of the action of the devil in the Church.

This version of the RAI film production rediscovers a pope that very few mourned, but whose heroic life now has led him to be raised to the Altar in the wake of two other great saints: his predessesor John XXIII and his successor, John Paul II.

Blessed Paul VI: The misunderstood pope will premiere on Salt + Light TV on Sunday October 19 at 9 pm EST.

The Great Saints (and Angels) of the Week

archangelsToday we celebrate the feast of the Archangels — St. Michael, St. Gabriel, and St. Raphael. Take some time today to look up  Scripture references to the different Archangels and meditate on the work of these heavenly messengers. For St. Michael flip to Revelations 12 (there’s also references in Daniel 10 and 12), St. Gabriel of course can be found in Luke’s Nativity story, and St. Raphael is featured in the Old Testament’s Book of Tobit (12).

stjeromeTuesday, we recognize on St. Jerome (c. 347-420), the great doctor of the Church perhaps best known for his for his translation of the Vulgate. A Biblical scholar, Jerome wrote in his Prologue to the “Commentary on Isaiah “Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ.” Here’s a reflection given by Pope Benedict during a General Audience on St. Jerome’s love for Sacred Scripture.

stthereseOn Wednesday we have a saint who has a great following, a heroic woman who though living as a cloistered nun has become patroness of missions — St. Thérèse of Lisieux. One of three female doctors of the Church, the Little Flower is an outstanding model of humility and her autobiography “Story of a Soul” is a must-have spiritual classic. Her parents, Louis and Marie Zelie Guerin Martin, joined her officially in the Communion of Saints when they were beatified on October 19, 2008.

GuardianAngelsOn Thursday we return to the Angels and recognize our Guardian Angels. In the Catechism of the Catholic Church we read: “From infancy to death human life is surrounded by their [angels’] watchful care and intercession. ‘Beside each believer stands an angel as protector and shepherd leading him to life.’ Already here on earth the Christian life shares by faith in the blessed company of angels and men united in God.” (CCC 336) It’s funny, we often pray to our favourite saints, but do we remember our Guardian Angel? Today is a good day to begin developing our relationship with our constant companion.

Though we don’t celebrate a saint’s day in the universal calendar on Friday, there is the popular First Friday devotion.

stfrancisThe Church celebrates another one of her favourite sons on Saturday, St. Francis of Assisi, namesake of Pope FrancisFrom reform to establishing religious orders, St. Francis’ contribution to Catholicism is vast and impressive. The Saint is associated very much with peace — from hymns to Days of Prayer in Assisi. While visiting Assisi in the summer of 2007, Pope Benedict reflected on the saint and peace — here’s his address.

Wow! It is truly a week of holy men, women, and angels! Why not make an effort this week to get to know some of this great pillars of our faith better?

 

This post was originally published in 2008.

Padre Pio- A Life of Gratitude

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The following post was originally published on Sept. 2008 by Matthew Harrison.

One of my earliest recollections of encountering the life of a saint was a biography on St. Pio of Pietrelcina, or Padre Pio as he is more commonly known. Though I don’t remember the title, I can vividly recall my mother reading the book to me as a young boy. I was captivated by it — hanging on every word as she described the saint’s miraculous life.

Since that time, I have had devotion to the holy priest. He’s like an old friend — not a saint that I gush over, but a reliable buddy who I know I can turn to. When his feast day roles around, every September 23rd, I’m filled with a certain sense of excitement as I recall the holy friar and how he has hung around my life.

As I was thinking about the good Padre this year it occurred to me how special, and rare that he is. It seems that in every age God chooses certain people to use as a more tangible and evident instrument of his love and mercy. People whose supernatural connection seems a little more clear — who may be granted special gifts or graces. Padre Pio’s experience of bi-location and the stigmata come to mind.

I was amazed as a child (and still am!) by the stories of his bi-location. As a child I was kind of hopeful it was a skill I would develop at school. Sadly, it didn’t quite make it into the curriculum.

His stigmata was fascinating to me as well. As a little boy I regarded it as a special privilege but at the same time found the idea of constant bleeding wounds to be scary. I certainly didn’t comprehend at the time the pain that he must have experienced — not only physically but even emotionally by those who labelled him a fraud.

Recently, Zenit published an article, as did Catholic News Agency, on a new book that explores Padre Pio’s stigmata. It’s amazing to consider the encounter that he had with the crucified Christ and the humility that he treated the special grace with.

What stands out in particular for me is what the crucified Christ said to the Italian Saint: “He was lamenting the ingratitude of men, especially those consecrated to him and favored by him.”

It makes me think…

Many times I have been ungrateful. Many times I have climbed down from the cross and run away.

Chances are I will never be invited to share in Christ’s sufferings in the same manner that Padre Pio was. However, I can still share in Christ’s sufferings in what I offer to God day in and day out.

Most of all, I can live a life of gratitude, for the blessings in my life, and for the unfathomable love and mercy of Him who loved us first.

… just as I was impressed with him as a young child, the lessons of Padre Pio still resonate with me today!

St. Pio of Pietrelcina, pray for us!

 

St. Alphonsus Liguori: Doctor Most Zealous

Founding an influential religious order, championing devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, the Blessed Mother, and the Sacred Heart, and mastering Catholic Moral Theology: these are but a few of the achievements that make the life and ministry of St. Alphonsus Liguori a true gift to the Church, both for his time and ours. St. Alphonsus was born on September 27, 1696, and died two hundred and twenty five years ago today, August 1, in 1787. In the intervening years, his life was spent as a prolific spiritual writer, a renowned philosopher and theologian of the Scholastic tradition, a zealous pastor, and a man of deep personal holiness and prayer.

Born to a wealthy Neapolitan family, St. Alphonsus’s brilliant mind earned him degrees in both canon and civil law by the age of sixteen. To the satisfaction of his affluent family, he practiced law as a respected lawyer until the age of twenty seven, when he suffered a disappointing loss in court. His disappointment prompted him to seek the meaning he longed elsewhere, and so he entered the seminary and after three years of formation was ordained a priest at the age of thirty. [Read more…]

Mercy Transformed into Mission

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On the Feast of Mary Magdalene – July 22

“Love the sinner, hate the sin.” The famous catchphrase first appeared in the letters of St. Augustine, when he wrote, “With love for humanity and hatred of sins.” It was later included in the autobiography of Mohandas Gandhi as “Hate the sin and not the sinner.” But I can’t think of any figure who better exemplifies the essence of this phrase than Mary Magdalene, whose feast we celebrate today.

What can we learn from the life of Mary Magdalene? The Gospels reveal a woman marked by a past of “demons” who encountered the forgiveness of Jesus and was forever changed. For Mary Magdalene, Jesus changed everything. His healing power in her life meant that she could no longer remain who she was, she was transformed: she became new in the love of Jesus. Set free of the seven demons that had possessed her – whatever their nature – she pursued a path of loving devotion, of closely following Jesus, of being part of the community of disciples, of putting Christ before all things, and of moving forward in the mercy he brought her.

What does this mean for us? I think we all know how easy it can be to become discouraged, disappointed, ashamed, and despairing, mired in the guilt, anger, regret, and frustration produced by our own faults and the faults those around us. We spin a cocoon of negative emotion that paralyzes us in our own selves. But Mary Magdalene shows us that there is something greater than our sinfulness, our shortcomings and the strife they cause; rather, that there is some One greater.

Mary Magdalene could have fixated on her demons – whether they were bad choices she’d made or misfortunes she’d experienced through no fault of her own. Instead, she reached out to Jesus and allowed herself to be made new. She allowed his love to be more powerful than her sins, and her demons gave way to discipleship. For the Christian, this life-changing encounter with the merciful love of God through Jesus Christ is not just a one-time experience but a constant renewal brought about by the transformative power of Christ at work in our lives. This love is offered to us each day of our lives, especially when we fail, fall, and flounder. Do we receive it? Do we accept it? Are we open to it? Do we allow it to renew us and urge us on? Does it leave us forever changed?

Mary Magdalene had not one demon but seven. Her story is relevant for us no matter what our demons may be. She was a sinner but more than that, she was loved. She allowed her life to become a response of love to the one who loved her first. Weeping she would remain with him at the foot of the the Cross, despairing as he hung dying for the world. “While it was still dark” on that Easter morning, burdened with tears and spices for burial she would venture early to his empty tomb, astonished to encounter him anew and sent forth to exclaim: “I have seen the Lord!” (John 20:18) The Mercy she encountered sends her forth on mission, not caught up in her own past but urged on by the love of her Lord: transformed to share his transformative love with all the world.

400th anniversary of the death of St. Camillus de Lellis

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Today is the feast day and the 400th anniversary of the death of St. Camillus de Lellis, patron of nurses and the sick.

Camillus de Lellis was born on May 25, 1550 in Bucchianico, Italy.  He possessed a violent temper and struggled with a horrible addiction to gambling, and by 1574 was reduced to poverty and shame in Naples. He fought for the Venetians against the Turks.  He became a Capuchin novice, but was unable to be professed because of a badly diseased leg he contracted while fighting the Turks. Through a long and hard struggle he eventually conquered his weaknesses .  His dramatic conversion was evident as he began to devote himself to caring for the sick. He became director of St. Giacomo Hospital in Rome.

Camillus chose a red cross as the distinguishing badge for the members of his Order to wear on their black cassocks. He taught his volunteers to look upon the hospital as a house of God, a garden where the voices of the sick were music from heaven. He obtained permission from St. Philip Neri to be ordained. Along with two companions, he founded his own congregation, the Ministers of the Sick , also referred to as the Camillians, who were dedicated to the care of the sick. They ministered to the sick of Holy Ghost Hospital in Rome, founded a new house in Naples in 1588, and cared for those aboard plague-stricken ships in Rome .

In 1591, the Congregation was made into an order to serve the sick by Pope Gregory XIV, and in 1591 and 1605, Camillus sent members to minister to wounded troops in Hungary and Croatia, the first field medical unit.  Suffering and gravely ill for many years, he resigned as superior of the Order in 1607. On July 14, 1614 he died in Rome. He was canonized in 1746, was declared patron of the sick, by Pope Leo XIII, and patron of nurses and nursing groups by Pope Pius XI.

One of his most famous words of wisdom was this: “Brother, if you commit a sin and take pleasure in it, the pleasure passes but the sin remains. But if you do something virtuous even though you are tired, the tiredness passes but the virtue remains.”

St Camillus de Lellis is a true inspiration to all of us who deal with our own moral, spiritual or physical struggles and a wonderful testament to the real miracles of Christian charity.

“Preferring Nothing to the Love of Christ” On the feast of Saint Benedict – July 11

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On 27 April 2005, at his first General Audience, Pope Benedict XVI told the assembled crowds why he had chosen that name for his ministry as Bishop of Rome. Among other reasons, this was an homage to Saint Benedict, whose feast we celebrate today, who has played such a role in the spiritual and cultural formation of Europe, particularly Pope Benedict’s beloved Bavaria.

Yet there was also a profoundly spiritual reason. Pope Benedict quoted Chapter 72 of the Holy Rule, “Prefer nothing to the love of Christ,” placing his ministry decisively under the watchful care of Saint Benedict: “At the beginning of my service as Successor of Peter, I ask St. Benedict to help us keep Christ firmly at the heart of our lives. May Christ always have pride of place in our thoughts and in all our activities!”

Pope Benedict has honored his patron in more than words. An old friend who saw him a few weeks ago quoted him saying that he was spending his retirement living like a monk – nothing would be more pleasing to Saint Benedict.

Perhaps the best way to honor Saint Benedict is to attend to his teaching and to love the same things that he loves. He wrote a Rule which serves as the foundation of life for many, many religious communities. One reason why this Rule has endured for over 1500 years is that it is so balanced, so humane. Benedict demonstrates a profound understanding of human nature, and his Rule looks on human weakness with a compassionate eye while making it clear that life in the school of the Lord’s service is not always easy. As the Prologue states, “In drawing up its regulations, we hope to set down nothing harsh, nothing burdensome. The good of all concerned, however, may prompt us to a little strictness in order to amend faults and safeguard love.” The Rule is designed to help communities of Christians live a moderate life of prayer and work, so that in all things, God may be glorified.

One bit of wisdom Benedict’s example imparts to the wider Church is the necessity of a rule of life for serious discipleship. There are all manner of profound spiritual traditions in the Church, from Saint Benedict to Pope Francis’ beloved Saint Ignatius, to more contemporary figures such as Charles de Foucauld or Blessed Teresa of Calcutta. To be saved from abstraction, though, these profound teachings need to be integrated into a rule of life for the serious Christian: what time in my day am I giving to prayer? Where in my life is concrete service to the poor? Through his Rule, Benedict wants to be sure that the Gospel permeates every aspect of life. This need not be limited to women and men who live in monasteries.

Another great contribution of Saint Benedict to the wider Church was the generous time he allowed each day to holy reading, lectio divina. There are numerous resources to help Christians learn and practice this form of prayer, but an old spiritual director liked to tell me that the heart of lectio divina, the prayerful reading of the Word of God, isn’t really confined to a method. When teaching and practicing this prayer with students, I would say that lectio is really working well when the Word of God is influencing you in ways that you aren’t even really aware. It need not be complicated. Read the scripture readings for the day’s Mass, and spend a few minutes with a single line.

Perhaps one example of this is Pope Francis. Summaries of his daily homilies at the chapel next to the Vatican guesthouse where he is living have become required reading for many. It is said that these homilies emerge from the very early mornings that Pope Francis keeps, rising to pray over that day’s readings for Mass. Sounds awfully Benedictine to me. While Pope Francis is a joyful Jesuit, his recent invitation to spend five minutes each day with Psalm 102 could have come straight from the lips of Saint Benedict himself!

Of course, one cannot look at Saint Benedict without considering his twin sister, Saint Scholastica. In the Office of Readings for her feast day, we read from Book II of the Dialogues of Saint Gregory the Great. Benedict and Scholastica meet once each year and spend the day in spiritual conversation. When evening comes, Benedict is ready to return to his monastery.  Scholastica protests, asking Benedict to remain for yet further conversation about the things of God. When Benedict refuses, Scholastica begins to pray, and a great thunderstorm begins that settled the argument: Benedict could go nowhere. Gregory the Great explains Scholastica’s success: “It is not surprising that she was more effective than he, since as John says, God is love, it was absolutely right that she could do more, as she loved more.”

This is a fine summary of the goal of Saint Benedict and his Rule, lectio divina, and all Christian living: to love more. Through Saint Benedict’s prayers, may God bring to fulfillment that good work in us.

Nickolas Becker, OSB
Fr Becker

 

This blog post comes to us from Fr. Nickolas Becker, OSB, a Benedictine monk of Saint John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota. Father Nickolas professed his final vows as a Benedictine monk in 2010, and currently is pursuing a doctorate in moral theology at the Alphonsian Academy in Rome.