The Catholic Guy Show Features Fr. Rosica from S+L Studio

LINO RULLI , HOST OF 'THE CATHOLIC GUY,' PICTURED IN STUDIO AT VATICAN RADIO

The Catholic Guy Show with Lino Rulli went on the road this past week and stopped by the S+L studio for  three days of live broadcasting. S+L CEO Fr. Thomas Rosica joined Lino on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014 for a fun afternoon full of stories on Popes, past and present, and much more. Listen to clips of Fr. Rosica on The Catholic Guy Show below:

The Catholic Guy Show airs on The Catholic Channel SiriusXM Radio Monday through Friday from 5-7 pm.

Philadelphians’ Invite Pope Francis to Visit in 2015

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With the World Meeting of Families to take place in Philadelphia in September of 2015, it is possible the Holy Father may visit the US for this first time in his pontificate. To make matters easier, the people of Philadelphia extend an invitation to Pope Francis in hopes of confirming his presence in 2015. See the video below to see what Philadelphians had to say to Pope Francis:

What would you say to Pope Francis to convince him to visit your city?

Tell us (or tweet @saltandlighttv ) us in the comments below!

Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ: ‘The church is not a church of ‘no’’

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Sebastian Gomes, Salt + Light writer/producer/director of The Francis Effect, gives us a glimpse into filming the documentary:

In the immediate aftermath of the whirlwind 2013 papal transition, everyone was comparing Pope Francis to Pope Benedict, pointing out the many differences and similarities between them. Naturally, nearly all of this commentary was coming from indirect sources, that is, from people who knew neither Francis nor Benedict personally.  For this reason we were very happy to secure an interview with Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, the Vatican’s spokesman under both pontiffs. If anyone understands the vicissitudes of the past twenty months, it is he.  It was important therefore, to ask him very particular questions, like how Francis’ methods of communication are different from Benedict’s and what it’s like working for a spontaneous Pope (check out Francis going to confession).  It’s clear from the interview that Fr. Lombardi is in the same boat as many of us: surprised and also deeply inspired by what he sees the new Pope doing on a daily basis. In other words, despite the great challenges of working for a spontaneous Pope (including what many perceive to be frequent misinterpretations of the Pope’s words by the media), the fact that Francis so naturally communicates the heart of the Gospel is enough to energize and sustain him.  He’s not alone.

Excerpt from March 24, 2014 interview with Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, the Director of the Holy See Press Office. To watch the full interview, purchase The Francis Effect DVD box set.

Gomes: How would you measure the success of the “Francis effect?”

Fr. Lombardi: For me, it is very clear that the most important point is to understand the center of the message of the gospel. And Francis says this and he repeats it continuously, “God loves us. God demonstrates to us his mercy, his love through Jesus Christ and through the gospel.” And so, this very clear accent about the love of God, the mercy of God, is something that the people have understood very well. And this has changed their perspective about the church. The church is not a church of ‘no,’ or a church of power, but it is a church of ‘yes’ for the well-being of souls, for everyone in the church of salvation. It is the church of service. This change of perspective, in the minds of many, many people, faithful and also not faithful, is the most important aspect of this pontificate so far and I can say also a big spiritual success.

The Francis Effect DVD box set is now available for online and from the Salt and Light store. The 3-disc set includes the feature documentary, official trailers and over 6 hours of extended interviews.

Bishops of Ukraine say “Ukraine is bleeding”- Perspectives Daily

Tonight on Perspectives
Bishops of Ukraine say “Ukraine is bleeding”,
And we take a look at Today’s General Audience

Official Icon for World Meeting of Families 2015

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On Sept. 9, 2014, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia unveiled the official icon and prayer of the World Meeting of Families, to take place in Philadelphia in September of 2015. The unveiling took place at the heart of the Archdiocese, the Cathedral Basilica of SS Peter and Paul, during the Sunday mass, celebrated and blessed by Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M.

Nelson Carlin of Pennsylvania was commissioned to create the image based on the theme of the World Meeting of Families- “Love is our mission: the family fully alive.”

“The idea with the painting is to make sure wherever you end up looking ultimately your eyes come back to Christ who is looking always looking at you,” Carlin said during the unveiling. “The hand of Christ in the center of the painting is blessing you when you see it and blessing the family.”

The painting features themes from the architecture of the Cathedral, the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the coat of arms of the Holy Father Pope Francis. The addition figures in the painting include the complete extended family of Jesus, with Sts. Ana and Joachim, parents of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Additionally, the Official Prayer for the World Meeting of Families was also revealed during the ceremony. The full prayer reads:

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The World Meeting of Families- Philadelphia 2015 Official Prayer

God and Father of us all,
in Jesus, your Son and our Savior,
you have made us
your sons and daughters
in the family of the Church.
May your grace and love
help our families
in every part of the world
be united to one another
in fidelity to the Gospel.
May the example of the Holy Family,
with the aid of your Holy Spirit,
guide all families, especially those most troubled,
to be homes of communion and prayer and
to always seek your truth and live in your love,
through Christ our Lord, Amen.

Watch the full video of the unveiling below:

The Church Up Close: Covering Catholicism in the Age of Francis.

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The Church Up Close is a professional seminar for journalists. The Pontifical University of the Holy Cross (Pontificia Università della Santa Croce) in Rome is offering the fourth edition of its intensive one-week Seminar in English, called The Church Up Close: Covering Catholicism in the Age of Francis. The Seminar, which takes place from Sept. 8-14, 2014, is designed for foreign journalists who cover the Roman Catholic Church.

Combining conferences, interactive workshops, personal encounters and on-site visits, the seminar gives journalists an array of tools to enhance the quality of their coverage of the Roman Catholic Church. There are 46 total journalists coming from different parts of the world to take part in this seminar including Italy, Rome, United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Spain, Argentina, Japan, Nigeria, Macau, etc. Some of the journalists come with a background in the Catholic Media, while some of them are from different communication offices of different dioceses and some of them are even from the mainstream medias, such as BBC, NBC, Europe 1, Fox News Channel, etc. And I thank you S+L to give me an opportunity to represent S+ L in Rome. Incidentally, I am the only one who comes from Canada!

RodneyBlog

On the first day, the topic that kicked off the seminar was ‘What is the Catholic Church?’ presented by Professor Fr. Paul O’ Callaghan. We are always questioning the reform of the Church. Fr. Paul O’ Callaghan leads us to imagine the Church as ‘Person’ and as a dynamic living organism. The Church presents itself and responds according to its circumstances, without, however, changing its fundamental identity. Fr. Paul O’ Callaghan described the fundamental identity as ‘DNA’.

‘DNA’ doesn’t change. However, human acts always changes in different centuries and different situations. The Church is the same! The fundamental teaching of the Church never changes, but for pastoral needs, the Church could be presented differently in different centuries and different situations.

Besides, he reminds us the Church is the ‘Mother’. Would you ask your mother to change her DNA? No! Her DNA doesn’t change, but she will always take care of you through exploring different ways.

The Church is the ‘Mother’ and the ‘Mother’ gives us ‘Life’. I reflected on this concept all day and also reminded myself to have a grateful heart always. Thanks be to God!

“The Church is our mother because she has delivered us in Baptism. Whenever a child is baptised, he becomes a son of Church, from that day, he is in the Church which cares for him as a caring mother, and she makes us grow in faith and shows us, with the power of the Word of God, the way of salvation, defending us from evil.” – Pope Francis, September 3, 2014.

By Rodney (S+L Chinese Programming)

Check out more photos of Rodney in Rome!

 

An MRI into the life of the Church

Synod

The following article by Fr. Thomas Rosica was originally published in the Boston Globe’s new website Crux: Covering all things Catholic.

This fall’s biggest Vatican happening is a summit of bishops from around the world convened by Pope Francis to talk about the family. Known as a “Synod of Bishops,” the Oct. 5-19 session’s official topic is “Pastoral Challenges to the Family in the Context of Evangelization.”

It’s expected to take up a slew of hot-button matters, from contraception and gay marriage to whether divorced and remarried Catholics should be able to receive Communion.

Francis has overhauled the process, and while most observers don’t expect sweeping doctrinal changes, it’s a key test of whether the new tone being set by a maverick pope may reposition Catholicism vis-à-vis some of the most divisive issues of the early 21st century.

Pope Paul VI conceived the Synod of Bishops in September 1965 as a sounding board to advise the pope on various aspects of the Church’s life. From the beginning they were consultative, not legislative.

So synods are less like Congress and more like an MRI into the life of the world Church.

Over the years, these gatherings haven’t produced tsunamis of new dogma or overturned Church teachings, nor have they issued earth-shattering results. The majority took place during the long pontificate of St. John Paul II, and the final documents, called “Apostolic Exhortations,” clearly bore the mark of the reigning pontiff.

With the passage of time, the process grew tired with little chance for evaluation or renewal. Having participated at the last two synods as the English language media spokesman, it was evident to me something had to change, and under Pope Francis it has.

Within months of his election, Francis appointed a new General Secretary to head the Vatican’s Synod office, an Italian Archbishop and Vatican diplomat named Lorenzo Baldisseri. Francis made him a cardinal earlier this year.

The synod’s machinery was turned upside-down a year ago, in October 2013, after Francis met over two days with Baldisseri’s synod council, a body of roughly 15 prelates from around the world that includes Cardinals Timothy Dolan of New York and Donald Wuerl from Washington, DC, in the United States. Those who attended the meeting were astounded, and pleased, at Francis’ hands-on involvement.

As a result, the synod this October will be something new. It’s really a preparatory session bringing together presidents of national bishops’ conferences, heads of Eastern Catholic churches, and Vatican officials ahead of a larger Synod of Bishops on the family set for Oct. 4-25, 2015.

Although the number of participants this time is smaller, they include a dozen or more voting members named by the pope, three priests chosen by an umbrella group of men’s religious orders, a dozen or more expert advisers, about a dozen representatives of other Christian churches, and up to 30 observers – more than half comprised of married couples who will be encouraged to address the assembly.

For both the 2014 and 2015 synods, Francis wants to hear from the grassroots.

Last fall, he had the synod office send out a questionnaire to the whole Church on topics that included contraception, divorce and remarriage, same-sex marriage, premarital sex and in-vitro fertilization. The Vatican received responses from 114 bishops’ conferences and about 800 Catholic organizations.

Though the timing was problematic, given the short turn-around for responses, the process nevertheless ensured that the synod didn’t begin with abstractions but a real, direct knowledge of the cultural challenges sweeping across the globe.

There’s huge media interest in this synod, which hasn’t always been the case. Because it will study issues pertaining to marriage, family, and sexual morality – including those that are controversial both within and outside the Church – the themes are those that the majority of Catholics deal with every day in the real world.

Francis has also made clear he doesn’t want the synod just to be a talk-shop.

In an April 1 letter to Baldisseri made public by the Vatican, Francis said he wants the reformed synod to have real power to deliberate on major questions, just as it did in the early centuries of Christianity. It will be a body outside and above the Vatican bureaucracy, accountable to the pope but also to the bishops of the world.

During the first week of the synod, instead of reading speeches over several days as has been the custom in the past, bishops will have three or four minutes to summarize their texts. They’re supposed to focus only on one theme, and, perhaps include ideas or clarifications that have come from listening to their colleagues.

The second week of the synod will be taken up mainly by work in small groups organized by language. Instead of brainstorming propositions for the pope as in the past, the small groups will work, theme by theme, on amending the meeting’s summary report, which is likely to be used as the working document for the 2015 synod.

To manage this two-week adventure, Francis has named an all-star team of Church leaders from around the world. Cardinal Péter Erdo, archbishop of Esztergom-Budapest in Hungary, will serve as Relator General (more or less the chairman), and Archbishop Bruno Forte of the Archdiocese of Chieti-Vasto in Italy will serve as Special Secretary.

The three presidents, or daily moderators, of the synod are Cardinal André Vingt-Trois, Archbishop of Paris, France; Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, Archbishop of Manila in the Philippines; and Cardinal Raymundo Damasceno Assis, Archbishop of Aparecida in Brazil.

Check out this Witness interview with Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, head of the 2014 Synod of Bishops.

Perspectives: Pope Francis turns his attention to Iraq’s Christians


Today on Perspectives: Pope Francis turns his attention to Iraq’s Christians, the mafia makes death threats against an Italian priest, and the church in Sierra Leone is using the pulpit to educate against Ebola.

What is a Catholic education anyway?

STUDENTS ATTEND CLASS AT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY IN NEW JERSEY

Regardless of background, ethnicity or faith tradition, almost everyone in our society today would argue that education is important.  We all acknowledge that becoming an “educated” person is worthwhile.  We spend a huge portion of our earnings and savings (or all of them and more!) on achieving that goal.  But, what does it mean to be an educated person?

This is an especially important question for those seeking a “Catholic” education.  What does a “Catholic education” look like in 2014?  What is its goal?  How is it unique?

There has been a trend, of sorts, developing in the area of Catholic institutions across North America and particularly in the United States whereby a school tries to be more Catholic by becoming more isolated or removed.  An attitude of protectionism from the disintegrating culture drives these initiatives.  Granted, there aren’t many of them, but there are enough to draw attention and sway popular opinion towards a presumption that the attitude behind them is, in fact, that of the mainline Catholic Church.

In his address during the plenary session of the Congregation for Catholic Education in February of this year, Pope Francis warned that this kind of isolationism is not the answer to the problems facing our societies today, but rather, Catholic institutions must “know how to enter, with courage, into the Areopagus of contemporary cultures and to initiate dialogue, aware of the gift they are able to offer to all.”  He went on to say that “education in our times is guided by a changing generation, and that, therefore, every educator – and the Church as a whole is an educating mother – is required to change, in the sense of knowing how to communicate with the young.”

When the topic of education arises, especially regarding Catholic education, it is important to be aware of these two approaches: the isolationist and the dialogical-adaptive.  Catholics must ask themselves – not least because we are frequently being asked by others – what is a Catholic education?  It is clear how Pope Francis would answer the question.

This question is also the theme of one episode of Salt and Light’s series The Church Alive.  In the episode, we go to the foundation of the Church’s teaching on education and discuss how it must adapt to the modern world in order to effect change.  This program is essential for educators at the high school and university levels, and for adult faith formation groups at parishes.

Purchase The Church Alive at the Salt and Light store

Perspectives Daily – Hong Kong Ordains Three New Bishops

Today on Perspectives, Pope Francis’ Sunday Angelus Address and the Diocese of Hong Kong ordains three new auxiliary bishops.