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“The Lord has freed me from all my fears” – Pope Francis’ Homily for Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul

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At 9:30 this morning in St. Peter’s Basilica. Pope Francis presided over the liturgy for the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul. During the Eucharistic celebration, he presented the pallium to 24 Metropolitan Archbishops (three more were unable to attend the mass and will receive the pallium at a later date in their Metropolitan Sees). According to the tradition, an official delegation from the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople was present at today’s ceremony, headed by the Metropolitan of Pergamum John (Zizioulas), co-President of the International Mixed Commission of Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church.  Also part of the delegation was Archbishop of Telmissos Job and Patriarchal Archdeacon John Chryssavgis.  During the mass, Pope Francis delivered the following homily that focused on the importance for pastors of placing their entire confidence in the Lord.:

On this Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, the principal patrons of Rome, we welcome with joy and gratitude the Delegation sent by the Ecumenical Patriarch, our venerable and beloved brother Bartholomaios, and led by Metropolitan Ioannis. Let us ask the Lord that this visit too may strengthen our fraternal bonds as we journey toward that full communion between the two sister Churches which we so greatly desire. “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hand of Herod” (Acts12:11).

When Peter began his ministry to the Christian community of Jerusalem, great fear was still in the air because of Herod’s persecution of members of the Church. There had been the killing of James, and then the imprisonment of Peter himself, in order to placate the people.

While Peter was imprisoned and in chains, he heard the voice of the angel telling him, “Get up quickly… dress yourself and put on your sandals… Put on your mantle and follow me!” (Acts 12:7-8). The chains fell from him and the door of the prison opened before him. Peter realized that the Lord had “rescued him from the hand of Herod”; he realized that the Lord had freed him from fear and from chains. Yes, the Lord liberates us from every fear and from all that enslaves us, so that we can be truly free.

Today’s liturgical celebration expresses this truth well in the refrain of the Responsorial Psalm: “The Lord has freed me from all my fears”. The problem for us, then, is fear and looking for refuge in our pastoral responsibilities. I wonder, dear brother bishops, are we afraid? What are we afraid of? And if we are afraid, what forms of refuge do we seek, in our pastoral life, to find security? Do we look for support from those who wield worldly power? Or do we let ourselves be deceived by the pride which seeks gratification and recognition, thinking that these will offer us security? Where do we find our security?

The witness of the Apostle Peter reminds us that our true refuge is trust in God. Trust in God banishes all fear and sets us free from every form of slavery and all worldly temptation.

Today the Bishop of Rome and other bishops, particularly the metropolitans who have received the pallium, feel challenged by the example of Saint  Peter to assess to what extent each of us puts his trust in the Lord. Peter recovered this trust when Jesus said to him three times: “Feed my sheep” (Jn 21:15,16,17). Peter thrice confessed his love for Jesus, thus making up for his threefold denial of Christ during the passion. Peter still regrets the  disappointment which he caused the Lord on the night of his betrayal. Now that the Lord asks him: “Do you love me?”, Peter does not trust himself and his own strength, but instead entrusts himself to Jesus and his mercy: “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you” (Jn 21:17). Precisely at this moment fear, insecurity and cowardice dissipate.

Peter experienced how God’s fidelity is always greater than our acts of infidelity, stronger than our denials. He realizes that the God’s fidelity dispels our fears and exceeds every human reckoning. Today Jesus also asks us: “Do you love me?”. He does so because he knows our fears and our struggles. Peter shows us the way: we need to trust in the Lord, who “knows everything” that is in us, not counting on our capacity to be faithful, but on his unshakable fidelity. Jesus never abandons us, for he cannot deny himself (cf. 2 Tim 2:13). The fidelity which God constantly shows to us pastors, far in excess of our merits, is the source of our confidence and our peace. The Lord’s fidelity to us keeps kindled within us the desire to serve him and to serve our sisters and brothers in charity. The love of Jesus must suffice for Peter. He must no longer yield to the temptation to curiosity, jealousy, as when, seeing John nearby, he asks Jesus: “Lord, what about this man?” (Jn 21:21). But Jesus says to him in reply: “What is it to you? Follow me” (Jn 21:22).

This experience of Peter is a message for us too, dear brother archbishops. Today the Lord repeats to me, to you, and to all pastors: Follow me! Waste no time in questioning or in useless chattering; do not dwell on secondary things, but look to what is essential and follow me. Follow me without regard for the difficulties. Follow me in preaching the Gospel. Follow me by the witness of a life shaped by the grace you received in baptism and holy orders. Follow me by speaking of me to those with whom you live, day after day, in your work, your conversations and among your friends. Follow me by proclaiming the Gospel to all, especially to the least among us, so that no one will fail to hear the word of life which sets us free from every fear and enables us to trust in the faithfulness of God.

Appeal for peace and dialogue in Iraq

Following the Angelus on Sunday, Pope Francis again appealed for peace and dialogue in Iraq. “The news coming from Iraq is unfortunately very painful,” he said. “I join the bishops of the country in appealing to governments that, through dialogue, it might be possible to preserve national unity and avoid war.”
The Holy Father also expressed his concern for refugees in Iraq: “I am close to the thousands of families, especially Christian, who have had to leave their homes and who are in grave danger.”
“Violence begets violence,” Pope Francis declared. “Dialogue is the only way to peace.”

The Pope concluded his appeal with a prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary: “Let us pray to the Virgin Mary, that she might safeguard the people of Iraq.”

Mosaic June 29 (2)

Tune in to see Quebec Archbishop to receive pallium on Wednesday

Archbishop Gérald Lacroix will be one of 40 Archbishops from around the world to receive the pallium on Wednesday.

[singlepic id=24 h=200 float=right]Every year in Rome at Mass on the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Pope Benedict XVI imposes the pallium on Metropolitan Archbishops who have been named in the past year.

To impose a pallium may sound like harsh language, but to wear it is a great responsibility. It is a symbol of union with the Pope, and a visible sign in the sharing of his mission. Similar to a stole, it loops over the Archbishop’s shoulders, with pieces hanging down the front and back. It is also made out of wool, invoking the idea of the Good Shepherd carrying his sheep.

Archbishop Lacroix will be the only Canadian to receive a pallium this year. He was named as the Archbishop of Quebec City in February, replacing Cardinal Marc Ouellet, who was appointed last June as Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops.

The Mass will also take on a special significance this year, as it marks the 60th anniversary of ordination to the priesthood for Pope Benedict.

Tune into Salt + Light Television for the Pallium Mass on Wednesday, June 29th at 10:00am ET/7:00am PT, or catch the encore presentation 8:00pm ET / 9:00pm PT.

Canadian Archbishop to Receive Pallium on Tuesday’s feast of Sts Peter & Paul

Tuesday marks the feast of Saints Peter and Paul.

legattAs always, it is also the day that Metropolitan Archbishops who have been appointed in the last 12 months receive the Pallium. The Pallium symbolizes their role as shepherds and teachers (Fr. Rosica’s offers more on the Pallium in a blog entry from 2009 HERE).

This year, Pope Benedict XVI will impose the Pallium on one Canadian Archbishop: Archbishop Albert LeGatt of the Archdiocese of St. Boniface, Manitoba.

He’ll join 37 other Archbishops from around the world who have gathered in Rome to receive the Pallium and celebrate Mass with the Holy Father.

Join S+L Vatican correspondent Alicia Ambrosio for full coverage of this special Mass.  It will be broadcast live on Tuesday, June 29th at 3:30am ET, followed by an encore presentation at 8:30pm ET/9:30pm PT.

Leading up to the Pallium Mass, join Salt + Light Monday, June 28th at 12:00pm ET as the Holy Father presides over first Vespers for the feast of Saints Peter and Paul at the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls.

As always, you can visit our Papal Events page for more information on our coverage of the Holy Father’s upcoming activities.