S+L logo

"The mob should lay off" - Pope defended in the Guardian

April 15, 2010
Jack Valero, a senior representative of Opus Dei, is defending the record of Pope Benedict in the pages of The Guardian. Valero addresses then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger's handling of laicization cases, Photo credit: CNS photo/Paul Haringincluding his efforts to more strongly enforce abuse investigations by bringing them under the purview of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in 2001.
“Some try to make out that Cardinal Ratzinger’s 2001 letter orders a cover-up by insisting that parties observe secrecy under pain of excommunication,” Valero writes in the British daily newspaper. “There is nothing in that letter preventing victims reporting the case to the police, and the assumption is that they should.”
Read the full article here.
Richard Dawkins's case against the pope is nonsense. Benedict has striven to rid the church of child abuse
By Jack Valero, The Guardian
Thursday 15 April 2010
On Sunday I appeared on The Big Questions on BBC1 to discuss whether the pope should "resign". It quickly descended into a heckling circus where calmly reasoned argument fell victim to unfocused outrage. Afterwards, two representatives of the Protest the Pope Coalition told me menacingly I had "no right" to defend Benedict XVI's record on abuse.
But shouting down the truth doesn't make it go away. I don't defend the pope because I think it is the duty of a good Catholic; I defend him because he is completely innocent of the charges made against him, and because the media has merged with the mob and misreported the facts.
The three recent stories from the US cited by Richard Dawkins and his mob as "proving" that the pope should be arrested under international law – the horrible cases of Murphy in Wisconsin, Teta and Trupia in Arizona, and now Kiesle in California – have this in common: the abuse took place in the 1970s; the police were informed and acted; the priest was suspended by his bishop; requests for dismissal from the clerical state ("defrocking") were sent to Cardinal Ratzinger's department in the Vatican, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith; and some time later the priests were defrocked – except in the case of Murphy, who died during his trial.
Continue reading
-
Photo credit: CNS photo/Paul Haring
Related posts
Good evening and welcome to Perspectives Daily. 2019 World Youth Day in Panama is coming up pretty fast and registration for this event is open and spots are starting to fill up. On today’s sho ...read more
Blessed Paul VI will be canonized later this year. Pope Francis made the announcement to the pastors of the Diocese of Rome during a question-and-answer session, that he had with the priests on Februa ...read more
Second Sunday of Lent, Year B – February 25th, 2018 Moriah. Sinai. Nebo. Carmel. Horeb. Gilboa. Gerizim. Mount of Beatitudes. Tabor. Hermon. Zion. Mount of Olives. Calvary. Golgotha. Mountains a ...read more
In today's episode of Perspectives Daily, we sit down and chat with the geniuses behind the Broadway musical hit, Come From Away. Canadian playwright Irene Sankoff and David Hein talk to Noel Ocol abo ...read more
Deacon-structing Lent: Our Baptismal Promise
FacebookTwitter
When you think of Lent, what do you think of? Do you think of feasting or fasting? Do you think of partying or penance? It’s true that Lent is a penitential season, but do you know that the word ...read more