Where do you want to celebrate Holy Week?
March 6, 2012
If you could celebrate Easter anywhere in the world, where would you go? For many Christians like myself, the answer is obvious: the Holy Land, where Jesus experienced his passion, death, and resurrection. Israel's Ministry of Tourism is making this possible for two fortunate people.
Holyland-pilgrimage.org is inviting would-be pilgrims to create a one-minute Youtube video describing why they want to celebrate Easter in the Holy Land. The prize for the video with the most views is a trip for two to Israel, included nine nights of accommodation and a guided tour. The trip will take place over Holy Week 2012. (Yes, that's very soon -- the first week of April.)
You need to act fast, because the contest deadline is March 18th. That leaves you only 11 days to collect votes. Watch the video above and visit their Facebook page for all the details.
For those who won't get to experience Holy Week in Israel, S+L can help you experience the next best thing: our bestselling pilgrimage documentaries Within Your Gates and Journey of Light are available at our newly revamped online store.
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