Catholics and Methodists see the glory of God because of Eucharist
April 27, 2012
Working for Christian Unity is harder than it sounds. The core of all Christian's faith is Christ. Many Christian denominations have some sort of celebration of Eucharist. Yet many of these Christian confessions who celebrate Eucharist understand that Eucharist differently than we do.
This week the Methodist church and Catholic Church in the United States issued a joint statement on the common ground the two churches share related to Eucharist.
The Methodist Church believes the bread and wine represent the body and blood of Christ and receiving communion is entering into communion with the community of believers. Everyone is welcome to receive communion at a Methodist celebration of the Eucharist, including members of other Christian denominations.
The joint declaration on Eucharist issued by the United Methodist Church and the Roman Catholic Church focuses on the fact that for both churches the celebration of Eucharist enables us to see God's glory in all of creation.
Read the full statement here on the USCCB website
Photo courtesy of Catholic News Service
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