S+L logo

Blessed are we who have not seen and have believed!

March 28, 2008
apostlethomas1.jpg
There is a proverb that says: "When the heart is not applied, hands can’t do anything." It seems as if this were written for Thomas the Apostle in today's very familiar Gospel story that provides us with an archetypal experience of doubt, struggle and faith. John’s first appearance of the Risen Lord to the disciples is both intense and focused, a scene set with realistic detail: it is evening, the first day of the week, and the doors where bolted shut. Anxious disciples are hermetically sealed inside.
A suspicious, violent world is forced tightly outside. Jesus is missing. Suddenly, the Risen One defies locked doors, locked hearts, and locked vision. He simply appears. Gently, ever so gently Jesus reaches out to the broken and wounded Apostle. Thomas hesitatingly put his finger into the wounds of Jesus and love flowed out. Long ago St. Gregory the Great said of Thomas "If, by touching the wounds on the body of his master, Thomas is able to help us overcome the wounds of disbelief, then the doubting of Thomas will have been more use to us than the faith of all the other apostles."
apostlethomas3.jpgThomas the Apostle is truly one of the greatest and most honest lovers of Jesus, not the eternal skeptic, nor the bullish, stubborn personality that the Christian tradition has often painted. Thomas stood before the cross, not comprehending. All his dreams were hanging on that cross. All of his hopes had been shattered. What do we do when something to which we have totally committed ourselves is destroyed before our very eyes?
What do we do when powerful and faceless institutions suddenly crush someone to whom we have given total loyalty? And what do we do when our immediate reaction in the actual moment of crisis is to run and hide, for fear of the madding crowds? Such were the questions of most of the disciples, including Thomas, who had supported and followed Jesus of Nazareth for the better part of three years.
Do we not often like Thomas, never seem to be there when Jesus arrived? Has the absurdity of the resurrection rumor sent us away? Jesus keeps on appearing to us, --again and again--unlocking the barriers between faith and doubt, between life and death, between past and future, between fear and joy. The Good News of the gospel is eminently clear: when and where we least expect him, and when we most need him, Jesus just appears.
apostlethomas2.jpgCenturies after Thomas, we remain forever grateful for the honesty and humanity of his struggle. Though we know so little about Thomas, his family background and his destiny, we are given an important hint into his identity in the etymology of his name in Greek: Thomas (Didymous in Greek) means "twin". Who was Thomas' other half, his twin? Maybe we can see his twin by looking into the mirror. Thomas' other half is anyone who has struggled with the pain of unbelief, doubt and despair, and has allowed the presence of the Risen Jesus to make a difference.
The doubting Thomas within each of us must be touched. We are asked to respond to the wounds within others and ourselves. Even in our weakness, we are urged to breathe forth the Spirit so that the wounds may be healed and our fears overcome. With Thomas we will believe, when our seeking hand finally and hesitantly reaches out to the Lord in the community of faith. Blessed are we who have not seen and have believed!
Fr. Thomas Rosica, C.S.B.,
C.E.O., Salt and Light Catholic Media Foundation
-
View Fr. Rosica’s Easter Reflections online by clicking HERE.

Related posts

World Day of the Poor on S+L
FacebookTwitter
This Sunday is the 2nd World Day of the Poor. Watch this exclusive video with the president of Chalice and check out S+L's TV lineup. ...read more
SLHour: From Mountains High!
FacebookTwitter
Remember all those great church songs of the 70’s and 80’s? This week we speak with Ken Canedo about contemporary Catholic music from 1979 to 1985. ...read more
Deacon-structing Doctrine part 1: Doctrine vs. Dogma
FacebookTwitter
In January 2016 I wrote this post: Deacon-structing Mercy: Doctrine and someone sent me a comment. I had said something about the permanency of doctrine and that person was challenging my use of the w ...read more
The Virgin Mary floating down a street in the Canary Islands and Pope Francis above a door in Cologne? Check out the Weekly News Round-Up. ...read more
US bishops speak openly about their feelings regarding ex-cardinal McCarrick and expectations for new sexual abuse policies - and other stories. ...read more