Fr. Rosica on the ‘Jesus’ tomb
February 27, 2007
What is most troubling about this recent publicity stunt of Jesus' burial place and the alleged DNA findings of Jesus and his family is that the media has spilled so much ink and wasted so much space on utter nonsense. One would think that we learned some powerful lessons from the media hype surrounding the "James" ossuary several years ago, and how important public institutions like the ROM [ed: Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum] were duped in their hosting such fraudulent works. To think that Vision Television would spend much money in acquiring the "movie" of Jesus' tomb calls into question the raison d'être of the television network. Why did the so-called archeologists of this latest scoop story wait 27 years before doing anything about this "discovery"? James Cameron is far better off making movies about the Titanic rather than dabbling in areas of religious history of which he knows next to nothing.
Rather than shaking the faith of Christians and Catholics, this wild story calls into question the folly of self-proclaimed experts who have neither faith nor integrity. The story damages the serious work of honest and intelligent archeologists who make significant contributions to history and civilization. The latest story makes one have serious reservations about the methods of the Israeli Antiquities Authority and other agencies who are subsidizing the media frenzy and casting major doubts upon any of their future efforts in being custodians of the land and patrimony of Jesus of Nazareth.
Once again, serious Christians and Catholics learn from this folly and turn to the New Testament and to the Church to encounter the Risen Jesus, Lord of history, whom the tomb could not contain, and whom no ossuary could possess.
Fr. Thomas Rosica, C.S.B.,
Scripture scholar
C.E.O., Salt and Light Catholic Media Foundation
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