S+L logo

Behind Vatican Walls: Laudato Si'

June 19, 2015
LS1
The pope’s ecology encyclical, Laudato Si, was finally, officially released this week. The label “ecology” does not fully capture the breadth and depth of what Pope Francis discusses in the document. He does outline the problems with our planet, but shows how climate issues cannot be disconnected from human issues like poverty, migration and quality of life. Then he leads readers to the roots of the problem: humans. Human activity and a disordered view of the role humans should play in relation to the creation lead to plundering of the earth’s resources, technological advancement at breakneck speed just to have power over everything and everyone else on the planet have - according to Pope Francis - got us into our present global situation.
Better than reading my one paragraph summary, here is the link to the full text of the encyclical in English. For other languages click on the the language of your choice in the upper right corner.
This papal letter was highly anticipated not just by Catholics but the world at large. Here is a collection of articles about Laudato Si and the key themes developed in it.
The New York Times had this assessment of Laudato Si, and the tradition of popes speaking out on global issues.
The Guardian provided comprehensive coverage of the encyclical, including this assessment.
While Canadian politicians did not acknowledge the encyclical (at least, none that got media coverage) The Globe and Mail did look at both the encyclical and its expected effects.
Catholic News Service, once again, has provided all the tools the average and not so average Catholic might need to fully digest this papal document (not that Pope Francis is difficult to understand.) First, a glossary of words and phrases that come up in the encyclical.
Then, a comprehensive list of the practical tips Pope Francis offers for saving our planet.
The Catholic Herald out of the UK offered this assessment of Laudato Si from a faith perspective, and it might scare those Catholics who would prefer their faith and their life be two separate things.
Watch this week's Vatican Connections below.

 
Alicia
Every week brings new, exciting, and sometimes juicy headlines from behind Vatican walls and every week Alicia delves deeper into one of those headlines. For a full run down of what’s been happening behind Vatican walls, watch Vatican Connections. Already watch the program? Come back every Friday for an in-depth look at an issue, headline or person.
Related posts
Sebastian Gomes speaks with Cardinal Donald Wuerl about Pope Benedict XVI, his resignation, and the Papal Transition to Pope Francis. ...read more
2018 Migrants and Refugees Message The Church has celebrated the World Day of Migrants and Refugees each year since 1914. This is an occasion for the Church and people of faith to reflect upon the rol ...read more
Pope Francis’ 2018 Lenten Message
FacebookTwitter
2018 Lenten Message of His Holiness Pope Francis “Because of the increase of iniquity, the love of many will grow cold” (Mt 24:12) Dear Brothers and Sisters, Once again, the Pasch of the Lord draw ...read more
Join us in prayer for the intentions entrusted to us by Pope Francis. For December 2017, we join the Holy Father in praying for: Saying “No” To Corruption – That those who have mater ...read more
Pope Francis’ Message for The 52nd World Day of Communications
FacebookTwitter
Message of Pope Francis for the 52nd World Day of Social Communications. This year, the day will be celebrated in many countries on Sunday May 13, Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord. “The truth ...read more